Lync Client: Automatic Fortune Cookie Utility

Here’s a just for fun powershell script for the Lync user. In the not so old days of Unix administration it was not too uncommon to have a ‘fortune cookie’ display when logging into a system. I’ve always thought that it would be neat to have something similar in the Lync client that would allow for an easy rotation of your personal note field. Little did I realize how easy it would be to add such functionality myself with some powershell and the Lync SDK!

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Powershell: Get-iQuote

While scratching an itch I found a cool little site that has a simple to use REST api for returning random quotes from multiple categories. Here is a small function which utilizes this online source to pull quotes from the web!

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Lync: Local and Site-to-Site Dial Plan GUI Script

In a multiple, or even single, site VOIP deployment there are some  steps you can take to make life a whole lot easier on your end users. One of of the common features implemented across phone deployments (VoIP or otherwise) is site local and site-to-site dialing shortcuts. These shortcuts generally reduce the number of digits users have to dial to reach one another. In this post I’ll go over how you might setup such a dial plan in Lync. First I’ll go over how you might setup such a plan manually then I’ll provide a GUI tool to do the same thing.

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Powershell: Check For Misplaced Certificates

Here is a script I absentmindedly put together one evening while power watching a TV series on Netflix with the wife. The general idea of this script is to check local machine, trusted root, and intermediate trusted root stores for misplaced or duplicate certificates.

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Exchange 2013: Server Component State Script

Exchange 2013 includes some powershell commands which allow you to set and view several components in the messaging infrastructure. This is important to be aware of as it means all Exchange related services can be running when looking at them in service manager (services.msc) but not actually doing anything. I went ahead put together a script to better gather this information for administrators.

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Lync: Voice Route Diagram Creation Script

Lync voice routing boils down to three basic components working in concert to decide call flow. It seems quite simple on paper, you assign voice policies which determine call routes based on PSTN usages (often called the ‘glue’). After looking at Lync voice routing way too many times I finally caved into producing a script to create diagrams of the things over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

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Exchange Mailbox Auditing with Powershell

Some time ago I wrote a script and GUI for performing security audits of Exchange mailbox and calendar rights in an environment. This script was far more popular than I anticipated and, I’m ashamed to say, was rather poorly written by my current Powershell standards. There is an obvious need to simplify the extraction of mailbox permissions or my old script would not still be so popular. So I’ve started to revisit my old code for this project in hopes of remaking it with my PowerShell reporting engine. The first step in this process is to pull out the several bits of code that do the actual rights/permissions extraction. I think I’ve finally got this part done and see no reason not to release this mini-library of functions first.

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Lync UCS Contacts Reporting with Powershell

By default a Lync enabled account within a Lync/Exchange 2013 environment will be enabled for UCS (Unified Contact Store). This means that the Lync contacts get saved in the Lync user’s mailbox and not the Lync database. In order to get a list of the contacts associated with these accounts you have to export data to a zip file with some debug Lync commands and, even then, the information is buried in a hard to interpret XML file.

I had a need to validate the contacts which were getting stored in UCS for Lync users and so I came up with this script to accomplish the task. It creates a temporary directory and exports all the passed Lync users’ UCS contact information in a zip file within the directory. The function then parses and returns psobjects with the contact information by reading in the xml file directly from the zip file (no extraction to disk). After returning contact information back as nicely formatted powershell objects the temporary files are all cleaned up.

Here are a few small examples of what can be done:

You can download this script at the Microsoft Technet Gallery or at my new Github repo.

Lync and UM Correlation with Powershell

I’ve been working on an Exchange/Lync voice deployment lately and have found a new level of frustration for the lack of connectivity between the several voice components involved in turning up such a solution. That being said it is not very difficult to validate your deployment with a bit of Powershell.

There are a few necessary results to gather where I believe it can be easy to ‘miss’ configuration steps when turning up or disabling users:

  • You enable a user for enterprise voice but forget to set their pin
  • You enable a user for enterprise voice but forget to UM enable their mailbox
  • You disable a previously lync enabled user (enterprise voice enabled or not) and forget to disable them in Lync
  • You enable a user for lync enterprise voice and um enable their mailbox but use the wrong extension.

These are just a few areas which can go awry in your environment either during the initial deployment or simply occur over time.

Here is a pretty simple function which I’ve put together which gathers info about all lync enabled accounts and contacts in the environment. As I extrapolate the Exchange UM information from AD attributes this function needs only be run on a Lync server or remote session. Here are the important bits broken down for those who are interested. If you just want the function and do not care for my ramblings you can download it either at the technet gallery or at my new github repo.

First ensure that the lync modules are loaded and available (I use -Verbose:$false throughout the script as I only want my own verbose output to be shown, not verbose output from every lync cmdlet that runs). ‘Break’ is a nice way to simply exit the function. As it is very unlikely this function will be called in a non-standalone manner this kind of non-terminating non-error throwing exit is fine. I throw out a warning at least.

I also break out the properties I’m going to be snatching from users and contacts in AD. This is not at all necessary but it makes for easier script reading later on. Contacts and users are not the same so were I to try and use the user properties against a contact when querying AD I’d get errors.

I then go ahead and query AD for users which are lync enabled. I use an old school LDAP filter because I’m an old school type of guy (well that and opath filters do not always have the nuanced properties available for me to filter against).

If the user is Lync enabled then they also have a primary user address so I use that to gather even more information about the account. I have to do this in order to get the PIN information as that is not held in AD from what I could tell. In fact, if you remove the -Verbose:$false from the Get-CSClientPinInfo and run this whole function with the -Verbose parameter you will see the Lync cmdlet spit out primary frontend server names that are getting queried for PIN info.

At this point since I already have the Lync info I go ahead and use it to determine if the user is UM enabled or not. If it is UM enabled I look for any proxyAddress starting with eum: followed by some digits and that is very likely an extension for the voicemail for this user.

With the information we have collected I create another object and return it. I use a bit of regex trickery to extract the telephone number and extension from the full LYnc URI while I’m at it.

As it is very possible to have enterprise voice enabled contacts (that is all an autoattendant is in AD) we should probably get that information as well. I use Get-ADObject with another ldap filter to only look for contacts which are lync enabled.

I then return everything pretty much the same way as I did for user accounts except skip the voicemail and pin checking (though now that I’m writing this and thinking about it a pin check against enterprise voice enabled contacts may not be a bad idea….).

With this function you can now create and export reports with some interesting information that may help in your deployment. Here are a few examples.

As always, I welcome feedback and improvements. You can download the function in its entirety from the technet gallery or at my new github repo.

 

PS Quickie: New-PIN

Setting a bunch of PINs for Lync devices is not difficult at all. Here is a script to pre-generate them should you find the need to do so. The function simply generates random digits between 0 and 9 and convert to a string. An exception is made for the first digit (as zeros are often not displayed in csv files when opened in excel) and only digits 1-9 are used.

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